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Noticed in the Press 2010

December 31

  • An op-ed by Daniel Henninger in the December 30 edition of The Wall Street Journal: ""Popes, Atheists and Freedom".

  • A book review by Eamon Duffy in the December 23 issue of The New York Review of Books: "A Hero of the Church".
    The book is "Newman's Unquiet Grave: The Reluctant Saint" by John Cornwell, Continuum, $24.95, 273 pp.

December 28

  • A commentary by Ed Feulner, president of the Heritage Foundation in the December 21 issue of The Washington Times: "A hand up, not a hand out".

  • An editorial on the Hungarian media law in the December 27 edition of The Washington Post: "The Putinization of Hungary".

  • An op-ed by columnist Anne Applebaum in the December 28 edition of The Washington Post: "A democracy slips" 'Hungary's too-popular leader'.

December 21

  • An op-ed by Strobe Talbott, president of the Brookings Institution, in the December 15 edition of The Washington Post: "Remembering Richard Holbrooke".

  • In the December 17 edition of The Washington Times, a book review by Albin Sadar. The book is: "Generous Jsutice: How God's Grace Makes Us Just" By Timothy Keller, Dutton, $19.95, 256 p.

December 14

  • A report by Rajiv Chandrasekaran in the December 14 edition of the Washington Post:  "Richard C. Holbrooke, 1941-2010" 'Brokered accord in Bosnia, sought peace in Afghanistan'.

December 13

  • From the November 11 edition of The Wall Street Journal, 'Notable & Quotable', featuring Nobel Prize winner Liu Xiaobo.

  • From the November 11 edition of the Washington Post, a reportby Andrew Higgins: "How China branded Nobel winner Liu Xiaobo a traitor".

  • Int he same issue, a report by Debbi Wilgoren, Keith B. Richburg and Chris Richards: "Liu Xiaobo, jailed in China, honored in absentia by Nobel Committee".

December 10

  • An opinion piece in the December 10 edition of The Wall Street Journal by Jamie F. Metzl, Executice President of the Asia Society: "China's Global War on Human Rights".

  • In the same issue, a report by Gordon Fairclough and Veronika Gulyás: "An Auction for Budapest's Bourgeoisie Puts Lenin on the Communist Block".

  • A report by Jeremy Page in the December 4 edition of The Wall Street Journal: "China Clones, Sells Russian Fighter Jets".

December 7

  • The Embassy Row column of the December 6 edition of The Washington Times, featuring Deputy Foreign Minister of Hungary, Zsolt Nemeth, on his visit to Washington and New York.

  • In the same issue, a report by Dusan Stojanevic: "Serbia shifts Westward".

December 6

  • A commentary in the December 5 edition of The Washington Post by Robert D. Kaplan: "A world with no one in charge".

  • A book review by John Steele Gordon in the November 27 issue of The Wall Street Journal: "This Rebel Came Armed With a Balance Sheet".
    The book is "Robert Morris: Financier of the American Revolution" by Charles Rappleye, Simon & Schuster, $30, 625p.

  • A book review in the November 29 edition of The Wall Street Journal by Brian Clegg: "How It All Began".
    The book is "Once Before Time" by Martin Bojowald, Knopf, $27.95, 309 p.

December 2

  • An editorial from the November 27-28 Weekend Edition of the New York Times, featuring János Martonyi, Foreign Minister of Hungary: "What the GOP Missed".

  • An opinion piece in the November 30 edition of The Washington Times by Daniel Pipes: "Islamist Turkey vs. secular Iran".

  • In the same issue, a comment by Joseph Bosco: "China's growing threat".

November 30

  • In the November 29 edition of The Washington Times, theEmbassy Row column featuring under 'Diplomatic Traffic' the arrival of Zsolt Németh, Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, to visit Washington DC on December 2 to discuss Hungarian-American relations with administration officials.

  • An op-ed by columnist Robert J. Samuelson in the November 29 issue of The Washington Post: "In Ireland's debt crisis, an ominous reckoning for Europe".

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Martin Feldstein, former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, on the U.S. economy: "How to cut the deficit without raising taxes".

November 28

  • A book review in the November 23 edition of The Washington Times by Nicole Russell: "A Man of Fortitude and Faith".
    The book is: "William F. Buckley (Christian Encounters Series) by Jeremy Lott, Thomas Nelson, $12, 152 p.

  • A commentary by Wahid Monawar in the November 24 issue of The Washington Times: "Taliban's 'Burn a Koran Day'".

  • An opinion piece by Nicholas Eberstadt and Hans Groth in The Wall Street Journal of November 27: "Time for 'Demographic Stress Tests'".

November 26

  • An op-ed by Anne Appleabum in the November 23 issue of The Washington Post:"Nato's next mission".

  • In the same issue, columnist Michael Gerson comments on recent statements by Pope Benedict XVI.

  • An op-ed in the November 25 edition of The Washington Post by Matt Miller comments on a book published in 1990 by William F. Buckley, Jr. with the title:"Gratitude".

November 22

  • An opinion piece by Kurt Volker in The Christian Science Monitor of November 16: "Ratify the New START treaty - but wait until January to do it".

  • A book review by Anne Applebaum in the November 19 issue of The Washington Post: "'Refuseniks' Rough Road to Israel".
    The book is "When they Come for Us, We'll Be Gone" 'The Epic Struggle to Save Soviet Jewry' by Gal Beckerman, Houghton Mifflin, $30, 598 pp.

  • In the same issue, an obituary by Lauren Wiseman: "Malvina Burstein, 97, helped save 1,500 fellow Jews in Budapest during World War II".

November 11

  • A book review in the November 11, 2010 issue of The New York Review of Books by Anne Applabaum:"The Worst of the Madness".
    The books are: "Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin" by Timothy Snyder, Basic Books, $29.95, 524p.
    "Stalin's Genocides" by Norman M. Naimark, Princeton University Press, $26.95, 163 pp.

  • Also, a book review of "Bloodlands..." in the November 9 edition of The Washington Times by John M. Taylor:"Bloodletting before and during World War II".

November 8

  • An op-ed by Jackson Diehl in today's Washington Post: "Jailed Russian dissident need's Obama's support".

  • A report by Bob Davis in the November 8 issue of The Wall Street Journal: "AS Global Economy Shifts, Companies Rethink, Retool".

  • An article in the Weekend Edition of The Wall Street Journal: "China's New Guru of Productivity" 'An improbable Hungarian-Israeli American is un unsung force in the country's industrial boom'.

November 4

  • An op-ed by Mohamed A. El-Erian in the November 3 edition of The Washington Post: "Unlock the Economy".

  • In the same issue, a report by Kathy Lally: "Jailed Russian oil executive says embezzlement trial is much bigger than him".

  • A book review by Norman Stone in the Wall Street Journal of October 30: "The Führer in the Making".
    The book is "Hitler's First War" by Thomas Weber, Oxford University Press, $34.95, 450 p.

October 30

  • An opinion piece by Rob Moll, a hospice volunteer and author, in the October 29 edition of The Wall Street Journal: "Halloween: A Christian Perspective".

  • A book review in the October 29 issue of The Washington Times by Martin Rubin.
    The book is "Philip de Laszlo: His Life and Art" by Duff Hart-Davis, Yale University Press, $55, 348p. illus.

  • A report by Vladimir Isachenkov of the Associated Press in the Washington Times of October 27: "Putin: Solzhenitsyn's Gulag Archipelago essential".

October 26

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in the October 26 edition of the Washington Post: "Holding Out Hope for Moderates".

  • An op-ed in the October 25 edition of The Wall Street Journal by Douglas J. Feith: "Can Israel Be Jewish and Democratic?"

  • A report by Vanessa Fuhrmans in the October 26 edition of The Wall Street Journal: "A German Ministry's Nazi Past".

October 20

  • A report by Alison Mutler and George Jahn in the October 18 edition of The Washington Times: “Communism leaves toxic legacy in Eastern Europe”.

  • In the same edition, an Embassy Row column featuring ‘Diplomatic Traffic’: on Wednesday, Viktoria Mohacsi, a Hungarian member of the European Parliament and defender of the human rights for the Roma minority will speak at Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholars in Washington, DC.

  • An opinion piece by Ilan Berman, Vice President of the American Foreign Policy Council: “Inscrutable Russian Tandemocracy” ‘Uncertainty is exactly what the Kremlin wants’.

October 18

Two articles in the Washington Post of October 17 under the heading: “Forecast for midterms: A Congress in conflict”:

  • ‘Obama faces likelihood of little help from Capitol Hill’ by Scott Wilson; and

  • ‘Vitriolic elections unlikely to prompt bridge-building between parties’ by Paul Kane.

  • Also, from the Wall Street Journal of October 16, The Weekend Interview with Robert Mundell by Judy Shelton: “Currency Chaos: Where Do We Go From Here?”.

October 16

  • An op-ed by Michael Gerson in the October 15 edition of the Washington Post: “A moralist in atheist clothing” ‘Christopher Hitchens: A humanist at heart’.

  • An op-ed in the October 15 edition of the Wall Street Journal by Rabbi Shmuley Boteach: “My Jewish Perspective on Homosexuality”.

  • In the same issue, a book review by Tunku Varadarajan: “Homage to Home”
    The book is “Extraordinary, Ordinary People” by Condoleezza Rice, Crown Archetype, $27, 342p.

October 14

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in the October 12 edition of the Washington Post: “The rise of the ‘ordinary’ elite”.

  • In the October 10 issue of the Washington Times, a report by Paul Kihn and Matt Miller: “Finland’s top grads become teachers. Why don’t ours?”

  • In the same edition, a book review by John Allen Paulos: 
    “2 + 2 = whatever you like”.
    The book is “Proofiness” ‘The Dark Arts of Mathematical Deception’ by Charles Seife, Viking, $25.95, 295p.

October 10

From The Washington Post of October 10:

  • An op-ed by Laura W. Bush: “A country for everyone” ‘Afghanistan must preserve women’s rights’.

  • An op-ed by Jack Devine: “Where is Osama bin Laden?”.

  • A book review by Robert G. Kaiser: “Masters of Mayhem”.
    The book is “Magic and Mayhem” ‘The Delusions of American Foreign Policy from Korea to Afghanistan’ by Derek Leebaert, Simon & Schuster, $26, 336p.

October 9

  • A report by Pablo Gorondi and Bela Szandelszky in the October 7 edition of The Washington Times: “Hungary: Toxic red sludge reaches the Danube”.

  • An opinion piece in the October 8 issue of The Washington Times by former U.S. Amb. Kurt Volker, now at the Center of Transatlantic Relations of Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H.Nitze School for Advanced International Studies: “Rebuilding Central Europe”.

October 6

  • An report by Steve Hendrix in the October 4 issue of the Washington Post: “Biden, Five Justices maintain tradition of Red Mass”.

  • An op-ed by columnist Anne Applebaum in the October 5 edition of the Washington Post: “A terrorism alert to ignore”.

  • A report by Daniel Pipes in the October 5 issue of the Washington Times: “Dueling Fatwas”.

October 4

  • A book review by Nora Krug in the October 3 edition of the Washington Post: “When cancer is in the family” One of the books was co-authored by former Amb. Nancy Brinker.
    The books are:
    “Promise Me” ‘How a Sister’s Love Launched the Global Movement to End Breast Cancer’ by Nancy Brinker and Joni Rodgers, Crown Archetype, $25.99, 356p.
    “What We Have” ‘A Memoir’ by Amy Boesky, Gotham, $26, 327p.

  • In the same issue a book review by Jonathan Yardley: “City Under Siege”.
    The book is “Berlin At War” Basic, $20.95, 432p.

  • The obituary by Matt Schudel of Zofia Korbonski, 95: “Polish patriot sent WWII radio dispatches” There is reference to the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.

October 2

  • An opinion piece by Robert Kagan in the October 1 edition of the Washington Post: “Obama’s Phase Two: Leadership” ‘America: Once engaged, now ready to lead’.

  • In the October 2 issue of the Washington Post, a report by Ernesto Londono: “Taliban steps up propaganda war”.

  • From the September 30 issue of the Washington Post, anobituary by Adam Bernstein: “Tony Curtis dies at 85; starred in ‘Some Like it Hot’ and ‘Sweet Smell of Success’.

Sept 30

  • An op-ed by columnist Anne Applebaum in the September 28 edition of the Washington Post: “China’s quiet power grab”.

  • An op-ed by Eliot A. Cohen, professor of strategic studies at Johns Hopkins University, and author: “Who loses ‘Obama’s Wars’ “The gang that couldn’t shoot straight”.

  • A book review in the same topic by Max Boot in the September 30 issue of The Wall Street Journal: “Backstage Drama”.
    The book is “Obama’s Wars” by Bob Woodward, Simon Schuster, $30, 441p.

Sept 28

  • An op-ed by Robert D. Kaplan in the September 26 issue of the Washington Post: “China’s Caribbean” ‘While we’re bogged down in Afghanistan, look what’s happening in the South China Sea’.

  • In the same edition, the obituary of Antonina Pirozhkova, 101, common-law widow of Isaac Babel, by Matt Schudel: “Preserved legacy of Isaac Babel”.

  • In the September 27 edition of The Wall Street Journal a reportby Marcus Walker, Charles Forelle and Brian Blackstone: “Currency Union Teetering, ‘Mr. Euro’ Is Forced to Act”.

Sept 26

  • A report by John Pomfret in the September 24 edition of the Washington Post: “China wielding power with ‘rare earths’ ”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed on U.S. foreign policy by Danielle Pletka and Thomas Donnelly: “Is freedom too high for the right?”

  • In the September 24 issue of the Wall Street Journal, a reportby Marcus Walker, Charles Forelle and Brian Blackstone: “On the Secret Committee to Save the Euro, A Dangerous Divide”.

Sept 24

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in the September 21 edition of The Washington Post: “Anger over papal visit shows that freedom of religion is alive and well in Britain”.

  • A report by Anne E. Kornblut and Scott Wilson in the September 23 issue of The Washington Post: “Two of Obama’s closest advisers among those likely to leave in White House shuffle”.

  • A book review in the September 23 edition of The Washington Times by Peter Hannaford: “Recalling his Cold War career”.
    The book is “Cold War Saga” By Kempton Jenkins, Nimble Books, $20.94, 425 p.

Sept 18

  • An op-ed by columnist David Broder in the September 16 edition of The Washington Post: “Who Will Profit in November” ‘The GOP Paradox: Strong and Yet Weak’.

  • An article by Barrymore L. Scherer, from the Arts Section of the September 15 issue of The Wall Street Journal: “Recalled from Obscurity” ‘Charles Deas (1818-67), a painter from the American West’.

Sept 16

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in the September 14 issue of the Washington Post: “For the U.S., Britain’s austerity is a foreign concept”.

  • In the same issue, a report by Brain Palmer: “Miniature nuclear reactors might be a safe, efficient source of power” There is a reference to Eastern Europe at the end of the article.

  • In the September 15 edition of the Washington Post, an op-edby Ruth Marcus: “The little engine that can’t: The myths about small businesses and jobs” There is a quote from Zoltan Acs, chief economist of the Small Business Administration.

Sept 14

  • A report by Colum Lynch in the September 12 edition of the Washington Post: “With $100 million Soros gift, Human Rights Watch looks to expand global reach”.

  • In the same issue, a report by Ceci Connolly: “The Inside Woman” ‘U.S. worker’s case reveals how drug cartels get help from this side of the border’.

Sept 11

  • An op-ed by Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow in the September 3 issue of The Wall Street Journal: “Why God Did Not Create the Universe”.

  • An op-ed by Lawrence M . Krauss in the September 8 edition of The Wall Street Journal: “Our Spontaneous Universe”.

  • A book review in the September 10 issue of The Wall Street Journal by Brendan Simms: “Salvation in Small Steps”.
    The book is “The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History” by Samuel Moyn, Belknap/Harvard, $27.95, 337 p.

Sept 7

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “In Europe, it’s no longer East vs. West”.

  • In the same issue, a report by Anthony Faiola: “In Europe, science collides with the bottom line”.

  • A commentary by Terry Teachout in the Weekend Edition of The Wall Street Journal: “Please, Omit Music (o Else)”.

Aug 31

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “’It is too soon to tell’ how the Iraq war went”.

  • An opinion piece by Maajid Nawaz in the Weekend Edition of The Wall Street Journal: “Islamism Is Not Islam”.

  • An op-ed by Roxana Saberi in the August 28 issue of The Washington Post: “In Iran, shackling the Bahai torchbearers”.

Aug 26

  • An op-ed by Michael Ledeen in the August 24 issue of The Wall Street Journal: “Cracks in the Iranian Monolith”.

  • An op-ed in the August 25 edition of The Washington Times by Ari Varon, former foreign policy advisor to the Prime Minister of Israel: “Muslim veil is political, not religious”.

  • In the same issue, a book review by Martin Rubin: “Giving the political giant his due”.
    The book is “Churchill’s Empire: The World That Made Him and the World He Made” by Richard Toye, Henry Holt, $32, illus. 423p.

Aug 24

Aug 14

  • An article in the August 5 issue of The Economist: “Hungary’s new government” ‘Orban out on a limb’ ‘Hungary’s new prime minister takes on the world’.

  • An opinion piece in the August 11 issue of POLITICO by Walter Dellinger: “What makes an American?”.

  • An op-ed in the August 13 issue of The Washington Post by William Dobson: “Russia’s cruel summer” ‘In Russia, fires – and politicians – are bringing down forests’.

Aug 11

  • An op-ed by columnist Anne Applebaum in the August 10 issue of the Washington Post: “Tom Sawyer and today’s children: same behavior, different treatment”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Richard Cohen: “The Economist’s unforgivable silence on Sayyid Qutb’s anti-Semitism”.

  • From the August 4 issue of the Washington Times a book reviewby Joseph C. Goulden. The book is “Churchill’s Secret War: The British Empire and the Ravaging of India during World War II” by Madhusree Mukerjee, Basic Books, $29.95, 400p.

Aug 9

  • Two articles from the August 5, issue of The Economist on the Catholic Church: “The fate of Catholic Europe” and “The Church and the law”. ‘Complacency has blinded the Vatican to the gravity of the abuse crisis”.

  • A commentary in the Sunday, August 8, issue of The Washington Post by Moshin Hamid: “The real problem in the Afghan war is India, Pakistan and Kashmir”.

Aug 6

  • An op-ed by columnist David Broder in the Washington Post of August 5: “The Senate, running on empty”.

  • An op-ed by Michael Gerson in the Washington Post of August 4: “The Accidental President” ‘Obama’s cool is leaving more people cold’.

  • A commentary by Arnaud de Borchgrave in the August 4 issue of The Washington Times: “CUSTER is the Strategy” ‘But CYA is the name of the game’.

July 24

  • A Letter to the Editor by Ambassador Géza Jeszenszky of Budapest in today’s edition of The Washington Post: “An unfair portrayal of Hungarian politics”.

  • In the same issue, a report by Patricia Sullivan on the passing of reporter Daniel Schorr at 93: “Reporter challenged officials and his bosses”.

  • An article from the July 22 issue of POLITICO by Andrew Glass: “House restores citizenship to Robert E. Lee, July 22, 1975”.

July 23

  • An op-ed by Matt Miller in the Friday, July 23 issue of The Washington Post: “Can America get its mojo back? The opinion piece includes views of Hungarian-born Andy Grove, former Intel CEO.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Samuel Charap: “Can a ‘reset’ change Russia?”

  • A commentary by Martin Sieff on resource rich Central Asia in the Friday, July 23 issue of The Washington Times: “Losing the resources game” ‘Distracted America is missing opportunity’s knock’.

July 19

  • An editorial in today’s Washington Post with the title: “Hungary’s rightward lunge” ‘A new government plays chauvinism – and targets the media’.

  • A book review in the Weekend Edition of The Wall Street Journal by David Gress: “Mao a la Francaise”.

  • The book is “The Wind from the East” by Richard Wolin, Princeton, $35, 391 p.
    A book review in Sunday’s edition of the Washington Post by Leslie Chang. The book is “Pearl Buck in China: Journey to “The Good Earth”.

July 17

  • An op-ed by columnist Michael Gerson in yesterday’s Washington Post: “Virginia museum's bust of Stalin is an atrocity by any name”.

  • An op-ed in yesterday’s Wall Street Journal by Darrell West: “We Need an Einstein Immigration Policy” There is a reference to Hungarian-born physicist Edward Teller (1908-2003).

  • In the same issue, a book review by Jamie Hamilton: “The Lessons of Living Things” ‘How the processes of biology are guiding computer design and purpose’.
    The book is “Natural Computing” by Dennis Shasha and Cathy Lazare, Norton, $16.95, 268 p.

July 16

  • An op-ed by Rachel Reid, Afghanistan researcher of Human Rights Watch, in the July 14 issue of The Wall Street Journal: “The Taliban War on Women Continues” ‘When 22-year old Hossai was told to quit her job by the Taliban, she refused to be bullied. She was shot and killed’.

  • A report by Martin Arostegui in the July 14 issue of The Washington Times: “Bolivia’s tri-border zone a haven for terror funding” ‘Area including Paraguay, Brazil, Argentina home to support networks for Islamic groups’.

  • An op-ed by Gary Bauer and Daniel Allott in the July 13 issue of The Washington Times: “Bringing science to the abortion debate” ‘New laws advance the pro-life cause’.

July 13

  • An op-ed in today’s Washington Post by Anne Applebaum: “Sarkozy’s cosmetic problem”.

  • An op-ed in last Sunday’s Washington Post by Kathleen Parker: “To kill a parable”.

  • In the same issue, a report by Sudarsan Raghavan: “Under threat of violence, Somalis play soccer – or watch – at their peril”.

July 10

  • A report by Christopher Rhoads in today’s Wall Street Journal: “The Submarine Deal That Helped Sink Greece”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Paul Berman: “What You Can’t Say About Islamism” ‘American intellectuals won’t face up to Muslim radicalism’s Nazi past’.

  • A book review in the July 7 issue of The Washington Times by Doug Bandow: “Life of an unlikely coup plotter”.
    The book is “Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Prophet, Martyr, Spy” by Eric Metaxas, Thomas Nelson Pub., $22.99, 591 p.

July 6

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in today’s edition of the Washington Post: “Democracy in trouble”.

  • An op-ed in yesterday’s Washington Post by Carl Gershman: “Ending the silence on China’s Uighur repression”.

  • A report by Meghan Barr in the July 1 issue of the Washington Post on the closure of St. Emeric, an old Hungarian parish in Cleveland.

July 4

  • An op-ed by Ronald D. Asmus in the July 3 issue of the Washington Post: “How to prevent another war in the Southern Caucasus”.

  • A report in today’s Washington Post by Mary Beth Sheridan: “In Poland, Clinton pledges support for citizen action worldwide”.

  • A book review in the Weekend Edition of The Wall Street Journal by Aram Bakshian Jr.: “Sparks of a Revolution”.
    The book is “Declaration” by William Hogeland, Simon & Schuster, $26, 273p.

June 29

  • The Embassy Row column by Jim Morrison in today’s Washington Times featuring Hungary’s Foreign Minister János Martonyi and Maximilian Teleki, president of the Hungarian American Coalition, with the title “Boring Country?”.

  • A report by Michelle Phillips in the June 25 edition of The Washington Times: “Hungarian foreign minister honors Victims of Communism Memorial in Washington DC”.

  • A look back to Sen. Robert C, Byrd (1917-2010) by Joe Holley in today’s Washington Post: “A public servant for the ages”.

June 28

  • A report by Thomas E. Ricks in the June 27 edition of The Washington Post: “A winning general picks a losing battle” ‘In Afghanistan, Petraeus will have difficulty in replicating his success in Iraq’.

  • In the same issue: An op-ed by David Broder on the firing of Gen. Stanley McChrystal and the resignation of Budget Director Peter Orszag: “Obama walks a tightrope”.

  • Also, a book review by Tara Bahrampour with the title: “Feminism, by way of the Koran”.
    The book is “Paradise Beneath Her Feet” ‘How Women Are Transforming the Middle East’ by Isobel Coleman, Random House, $26, 315p.

June 20

  • An opinion piece by Peggy Noonan in the Weekend Edition of The Wall Street Journal: “A Snakebit President”.

  • A book review by Martin Rubin in the June 18 edition of The Washington Times. 
    The book is “The Last Fighting Tommy: The Life of Harry Patch, Last Veteran of the Trenches” by Harry Patch with Richard Van Emden, Bloomsbury, $15.95, 338 p. illus.

  • From The New York Book Review of June 10: “Reading Mandelstam on Stalin” by José Manuel Prieto.

June 18

  • An op-ed by Kathleen Parker in the June 16 issue of the Washington Post: “The power of education is the real gold in Afghanistan” There is reference to Laura Bush for her support to education initiatives.

  • A report by Alaistair Macaulay in the June 14 issue of the New York Times on the San Francisco Ethnic Dance Festival, with participants from Hungarians from Transylvania.

June 15

  • A dance rewiew in the June 14 issue of the NY Times webarchive: "For Armchair Travelers, the World, Intertwined" by Alastair Macaulay.

June 14

  • A news report from Ralph Vertabedian in today’s Los Angeles Times: “Cleveland’s Catholic Church closures leave ethnic enclaves dispirited” ‘Proud Eastern European communities fight to save what they see as a cultural heritage’.

  • A brief report on the Slovak elections in today’s Washington Times. There is a reference to Hungarian ethnic parties.

  • A book review in yesterday’s Washington Post by Norm Ornstein, scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.
    The book is “Speaker Nancy Pelosi” ‘And the New American Politics’ by Ronald M. Peters, Jr. and Cindy Simon Rosenthal, Oxford University Press, $29.95, 320p.

June 12

  • A comment in today’s Washington Post by Diane Kochilas: “As goes Greek cuisine, so goes the Greek economy”.

  • An op-ed by Fouad Ajami, senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, in yesterday’s Wall Street Journal: “Iran and the ‘Freedom Recession’ ”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Iranian filmmaker and opposition activist, Mohsen Makhmalbaf: “How the West Can Help Iran’s Green Movement”.

June 11

  • An article by Benett Ramberg in the June 9 issue of the Washington Times: “Syria’s nuclear challenge” There is a reference to the regime of Nicolae Ceausescu of Romania.

  • A Letter to the Editor by Geza Cseri in the June 10 issue of the Washington Times: “Resurrect Danubian Confederation idea”.

  • In the same issue, the Embassy Row column of The Washington Times by James Morrison highlighting a serious social issue: “Sex Slaves at World Cup”.

June 9

  • A news report by Gordon Fairclough in today’s Wall Street Journal: “Hungary Plans Bank Tax, Budget Cuts to Soothe Markets”.

  • An article by Eli Lake in today’s Washington Times: “American Jewish community ends support of Turkish interests on Hill”.

  • An Editorial on Russia in today’s edition of the Washington Post: “Show Trial: Should ties to Russia be linked to its record on rights?”.

June 8

  • An op-ed by columnist Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “Germany’s dangerous code of silence”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by columnist Richard Cohen, with the title: “What Helen Thomas missed”.

  • An op-ed by Fareed Zakaria in yesterday’s Washington Post: “What does China want?”.

June 5

  • A report by Charles Forelle, Veronika Gulyas and Margit Feher in today’s Wall Street Journal: “Hungary’s Economic Woes Punish Euro, Roil Markets”.

  • An op-ed by columnist Charles Krauthammer in yesterday’s Washington Post: “Those troublesome Jews”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Michael Gerson: “Mark Souder and the case for grace”.

June 1

  • An op-ed by Jackson Diehl in yesterday’s Washington Post: “Obama's national security strategy is light on the human rights agenda”.

  • A book review in yesterday’s Washington Times by John R. Coyne Jr.: “Celebrating Buckley’s well lived life”.
    The book is “William B. Buckley Jr.: The Maker of a Movement” by Lee Edwards, ISI Books, $24.95, 223 p.

May 29

  • A blog from The Economist of May 27 on the Hungarian citizenship measure: ‘Slovakia and Hungary’ “Pandora’s Passports” The comment includes views from a few readers.

  • An op-ed by Mark Brzezinski in the Washington Post of May 28: “Obama administration gets tough on business corruption overseas”.

  • An op-ed by Mikhail B. Khodorkowsky, former chairman of Yukos Oil Co. and currently in prison and on a hunger strike, in the May 26 issue of the Washington Post: “The world’s biggest threat is corruption, not nuclear weapons”.

May 27

  • A report by Veronika Gulyas and Leos Rousek in today’s Wall Street Journal: “Hungary Expands Citizenship, and Neighbor Cries Foul”.

  • An op-ed by Robert Kagan in yesterday’s Washington Post: “A hollow ‘reset’ with Russia”.

  • In the same issue, a comment by former Amb. Kurt Volker: “Sochi Olympics offer a lever on Russia and rights”.

May 25

  • A report by Ben Smith, Jen DiMascio and Laura Rozen in yesterday’s issue of Politico: “The Gates-Clinton Axis”.

  • An article by Rowan Scarborough in yesterday’s Washington Times: “Israel arms may not be enough to stop nukes”.

  • An op-ed by columnist Robert Samuelson in yesterday’s Washington Post: “Why the U.S. should support Europe’s rescue package”.

May 21

  • An op-ed by columnist Charles Krauthammer in today’s Washington Post: “The fruits of weakness”.

  • An op-ed by Roger Pardo-Maurer in yesterday’s POLITICO: “Mexico's problems go beyond cartels”.

  • A Letter to the Editor by Janos Szekeres in today’s Washington Times: “Europe's lesser-known righteous Gentiles”.

May 18

  • An op-ed by columnist Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “The rule of law walks the plank”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by economist Martin Feldstein: “Putting the lid on European deficits”.

  • A book review in today’s Washington Times by Priscilla Taylor: “A practical First Lady looks back”.
    The book is: “Spoken from the Heart” by Laura Bush, Scribner, $30, 456 p. illus.

May 15

  • A report by Hillary May in yesterday’s Washington Times on the persecution of a religious minority by the Iranian regime: “Seven Baha’i leaders kept locked up”.

  • In the same issue, a book review by James Srodes with the title: “To Witness Without Understanding” There is a reference to Hungary in the review. The books are:
    “Holocaust: The Nazi Persecution and Murder of the Jews” by Peter Longerich, Oxford University Press, $34.95, 608 p.
    “Travels in the Reich, 1933-45: Foreign Authors Report from Germany” by Oliver Lubrich, Kenneth J. Northcott, Sonia Wichmann and Krouk Dean, U. of Chicago Press, $20.50, 336 p.
    “The Liberators: America’s Witnesses to the Holocaust” by Michael Hirsh, Bantam Books, $27, 356 p.

  • A book review by Joseph C. Goulden entitled: “Russia against Napoleon” There is reference to “the Red Army brutality in the waning days of World War II”.
    The book is “Russia Against Napoleon: The True Story of the Campaigns of War and Peace” by Dominic Lieven, Viking, $35.95, 619 p.

May 13

  • An op-ed in today’s Washington Post by an Iranian dissident, Roxana Saberi: “A chance to stand tall against Iran on human rights”.

  • An opinion piece in yesterday’s issue of Politico by Mark Dubowitz and Ilan Berman: “Fix Iran energy loophole”.

  • In the same issue, a report by Eamon Javers: “Fed lends bucket to EU bailout”.

May 11

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “Time for Greece to play by the E.U.’s rules”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by columnist Richard Cohen on the romance between Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) and Martin Heidegger (1889-1976): “The banality of love”.

May 10

  • A commentary in yesterday’s issue of the Washington Post by Carmen and Vincent Reinhart: “Five Myths about the European debt crisis”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Kathleen Parker: “The quest to sort out competing and comparable religions”.

  • An op-ed by columnist Robert Samuelson in today’s Washington Post: “The welfare state’s death spiral”.

May 7

  • An opinion piece by former Ambassador Kurt Volker in the May 5th issue of the Telegraph: “General Election 2010: The next Prime Minister must nurture the Special Relationship” ‘The United States, and the world, need a strong, independent Britain’.

  • A book review in the May 5th issue of the Washington Times by John R. Coyne Jr. The book is “The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism: A Short History” by David Farber, Princeton University Press, $29.95, 312 p.

May 6

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in the May 4th issue of the Washington Post: “Another human rights irony at the U.N.”

  • An op-ed in today’s Washington Post by David Broder, with the title: “Two countries, one looming political test”.

  • A Letter to the Editor in today’s Washington Times by János Szekeres: “Hungary's Roma need more than pity”.

May 2

  • A report by Pablo Gorondi and George Jahn of Associated Press in today’s Washington Times with the title “Gypsies fear violence after election”.

  • From the Washington Post of May 1 an op-ed by Jordan Ellenberg: “The census will be wrong. We could fix it.”.

  • An obituary by Emma Brown in the April 28 issue of the Washington Post: “Alice Miller, psychoanalyst and author, dies at 87”.

April 29

  • An article in today’s Politico by Kenneth P. Voguel and Laura Rozen: “Clinton keeps a hand in politics”.

  • A report in yesterday’s Washington Times by Eli Lake: “GOP sees Obama rift as way to woo Jews”.

  • A book review by Joshua Rubenstein in yesterday’s issue of Wall Street Journal. The book is “Stalin’s Romeo Spy” by Emil Draitser, Northwestern University, $35, 420p.

April 27

  • An opinion piece in the April 22 issue of the Christian Science Monitor by Kurt Walker, former US Ambassador to NATO, and senior fellow and Managing Director of the Center for Transatlantic Relations at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies: “Tipping point in Bosnia, Serbia and Kosovo: EU and NATO must finish the job”.

  • An op-ed in today’s Washington Post by columnist Anne Applebaum: “Britain’s spot of Tea Party”.

  • In the same issue, and op-ed by columnist Richard Cohen: “In Arizona, immigration creates another Tea Party moment” There is reference to a 1942 movie, “Casablanca”, which was directed by the late Hungarian-born Michael Curtiz (1886-1962).

April 26

  • A report by Pablo Gorondi of the Associated Press on the result of the second round of the Hungarian elections in today’s Washington Times: “Center-right Fidesz party wins parliamentary vote”.

  • In the same issue, a write-up in the Culture Briefs column: “Know Orwell”.

April 24

  • An op-ed by Bill Gates and Chad Holliday in the April 23 issue of the Washington Post: “Energy sector poised for innovation – with the right spark”.

  • A book review in the April 23 issue of The Washington Times by Joseph C. Goulden. The book is “Supreme Power: Franklin Roosevelt and the Supreme Court” by Jeff Shesol, Norton, $27.95, 644p.

  • In today’s issue of the Washington Post, the obituary of Whitney Harris, the last surviving Nuremberg prosecutor of the American legal team.

April 22

  • An article in today’s Washington Times co-authored by Joe Ralston, George Robertson, Frank Miller and Kori Schake: “The next arms-control agreement”.

  • In the same issue, an opinion piece by Sen. Richard Lugar: “Reform before re-funding”.

  • In today’s Washington Post, an op-ed by columnist David Broder: “The rewards – and limits – of Obama’s patience”.

April 19

  • An op-ed by columnist Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “Nature hoists Europe back in time”.

  • A report by Josh Gerstein in today’s Politico: “War of words over Obama’s soft tone”.

April 15

  • From the Embassy Row column of The Washington Times of April 13, a comment on the first round of the Hungarian elections by Maximilian Teleki, president of the Hungarian American Coalition.

  • From today’s Washington Post: an op-ed by columnist Davis Broder: “Obama and the challenge of slow change”.

  • Another op-ed from today’s Washington Post by David Ignatius: “President Obama’s ‘regular order’.

April 13

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in today’s Wahington Post: “Out of tragedy, a détente of sorts, between Russia, Poland”.

  • A book review by Steven Roberts in the April 11 issue of the Washington Post. The book is:
    “The Long Way Home” ‘An American Journey From Ellis Island to the Great War’ by David Laskin, Harper, $26.99, 386p.

  • A book review in the April 8 issue of the New York Review of Books by Deborah Eisenberg: “Quiet, Shattering, Perfect”.
    The book is “Skylark” by Dezso Kosztolanyi, New York Review of Books, $15 pp, 224p.

April 10

  • A report by Pablo Gorondi, of the Associated Press, in yesterday’s Washington Post: “Hungary’s far right on verge of election gains”.

  • A book review by Gwen Ifill in the Washington Post of April 4. The book is: “The Bridge” ‘The Life and Rise of Barack Obama’ by David Remnick, Knopf, $29.95, 656p.

April 6

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: ”Is Russia finally ditching its revisionist history on Katyn?”.

  • An op-ed by Masha Lipman in yesterday’s Washington Post: “How Russia nourishes radical Islam”.

  • An article by Matthew Day in the British Telegraph of April 4: “Rise of Hungary’s far-right Jobbik stirs disturbing echoes of the 1940s”.

April  5

  • An op-ed by Peggy Noonan in the Weekend Edition of The Wall Street Journal: “The Catholic Church’s Catastrophe”.

  • A book review by Isobel Coleman: “What is the matter with Yemen?” The books are:
    “Yemen” ‘Dancing on the Heads of Snakes” by Victoria Clark, Yale University, $20, 311p.
    “I am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced” by Nujood Ali with Delphine Minoui, translated from the French by Linda Coverdale, Three Rivers, $12, 188p.

  • A book review by Jane Lampman with the title: “Turning to history to experience the power of the Gospels”. The books are:
    “Paul Among the People” ‘The Apostle Reinterpreted and Re-imagined in His Own Time’ by Sarah Ruden, Pantheon, $25, 214p.
    “The Hidden Power of the Gospels” ‘Four Questions, Four Paths, One Journey’ by Alexander J. Shaia and Michelle Gaugy, HarperOne, $26.99, 367p.

April 3

  • A report by Karl Ritter of the Associated Press in the March 29 issue of The Washington Times: “Hate crimes force Jews out of Malmo”.

  • The obituary of Jaime A. Escalante (1930-2010), a public-school teacher, who was successful in turning around the low performing Garfield High School of East Los Angeles.

  • A report by Arthur Max and Karl Ritter in the April 1 edition of The Washington Post on the fate of Raoul Wallenberg, who was arrested in Budapest in 1945 by the Soviet Army: “New Evidence on WWII mystery of Raoul Wallenberg”.

March 29

  • An op-ed by Sebastian Mallaby in the Washington Post of March 26: “For Rising China, an identity crisis”.

  • An op-ed by columnist Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “In Poland, the life of a candidate’s wife”

  • A book review by James Srodes in today’s Washington Times: “The ‘Great Writ’ and our rights”.
    The book is “Habeas Corpus: from England to Empire” by Paul D. Halliday, Harvard U. Press, $39.95, 490 p.

March 25

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “From Britain’s Tories, lessons for the GOP”.

  • A commentary in the March 23 issue of The Washington Times by John R. Bolton, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations: “EU’s loss may be West’s gain”.

  • A book review by William Murchison: “Christianity’s long, momentous life” in the March 24 issue of The Washington Times.
    The book is: “Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years” by Diarmaid MacCulloch, Viking, $45, 1184 p.

March 23

  • Two op-ed pieces related to the health care bill in today’s issue of the Washington Post: one by Michael Gerson: “A president both strong and wrong”.

  • The other by columnist Richard Cohen: “It’s progress, not socialism”.

  • An article in today’s Politico by Alex Isenstadt: “Israel is the Primary Issue”.

March 20

  • An op-ed by Robert Kagan in the Washington Post of March 17: “Allies everywhere feeling snubbed by President Obama”.

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in the Washington Post of March 15: “Between the U.S. and Britain, an ideological parting”.

March 14

  • A report by Eleanor Herman in the March 14 edition of the Sunday magazine of The Washington Post: “All the King’s Men” A secretary in Washington doubles as ruler in the fishing village of Otuam, Ghana.

  • A book report by James Srodes in the Washington Times of March 12: “The horror of survival”
    The book is “Jews in Nazi Berlin: From Kristallnacht to Liberation” Edited by Beate Meyer, Hermann Simon and Chana Schutz, University of Chicago Press, $40, p. 391.

  • A book review by Steven Levingston in the March 7 edition of the Washington Post.
    The book is “Courage and Consequence” ‘My life as a Conservative in the Fight’ by Karl Rove, Threshold Editions, $30, 596p.

March 12

  • An article from The Economist, with the title “Slovakia’s disturbing patriotism” published on March 12, 2010.

March 11

  • A commentary by Ariel Cohen of the Heritage Foundation in the Washington Times of March 10: “Free Khodorkovsky”.

  • An op-ed by columnist Anne Applebaum in the March 9 issue of the Washington Post: Germany’s tug-of –war with Greece”.

  • The same issue, the obituary of Arnold Beichman, (1913-2010), “anti-communist scholar and author” by staff writer Emma Brown. It has a reference to the Hungarian revolution of 1956.

March 9

  • An article from The Economist, with the title: “Energy Security in Europe” ‘Central questions’ ‘United in the cause of undermining Russian pipeline monopolies’.

March 6

  • An article in the Weekend Edition of the Wall Street Journal: “An Epic Spree of Mischief” ‘New York Politicians Extend Era of Malfeasance with a Fresh Wave of Scandals’ The report includes a comment by former Governor George Pataki.

  • In the same issue, an article by Karen Wilkin: “A Transfiguring Moment” ‘Caravaggio’s potent, astonishing ‘Conversion of Saul’.

  • Terry Techaout comments on: “Benny Goodman at Carnegie Hall”.

March 5

  • An op-ed by Robert Kagan in today’s Washington Post: “Foreign policy, common ground” ‘One area where bipartisanship still stands a chance’.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Peter Orszag, director of the Office of Management and Budget and Nancy-Ann DeParle, director of the White House Office of Health Reform: “Health reform that won’t break the bank”.

  • And a report by Mary Beth Sheridan: “Over Turkish protests, House panel call killing of Armenians ‘genocide’.

March 2

  • An op-ed by David Ignatius in last Sunday’s Washington Post: “The U.S. is at a crucial point of defining its direction”.

  • A report by Philip Pan on Ukraine: “New Ukrainian president could disappoint supporters in the Kremlin”.

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “Chile and Haiti: A look at earthquakes and politics”.

February 27

  • An op-ed by Anders Aslund in yesterday’s Washington Post: “The end seems near for the Putin model”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Mary Eberstadt: “For soldiers, single motherhood becomes another battlefield”.

  • In yesterday’s Washington Times, an opinion piece by Ed Feulner of the Heritage Foundation: “Mapping out the mission” ‘The Mount Vernon Statement’.

February 25

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in the February 22 issue of The Washington Post: “Prepare for war with Iran – in case Israel Strikes”.

  • A book review by Jeffrey Collins in the February 17 issue of the Wall Street Journal: “The Art of Being Ruled”.
    The book is “Hobbes and the Law of Nature” by Perez Zagorin, Princeton, $29.95, 177 p.

February 21

  • An article in today’s Washington Times by Robert A. Wehrle: “Afghan mess bigger than we thought”.

  • From the Sunday, February 21 issue of the Washington Post, areport by James Hohmann on the passing of Gen. Alexander Haig (1924-2010).

  • In the same issue, a book review by Jonathan Yardley. The book is: “Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print and Power” by James McGrath Morris, Harper, $29.99, 558 p.

February 20

  • An op-ed by Charles Krauthammer in yesterday’s Washington Post: “It’s nonsense to say the U.S. is ungovernable”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Masha Lipman: “Protests are showing cracks in Kremlin policy”.

  • In the February 11 issue of The New York Review of Books, Anne Applebaum comments on Arthur Koestler: “Yesterday’s Man?”
    The book is “Koestler: The Literary and Political Odyssey of a Twentieth-Century Skeptic” by Michael Scammell. Random House, $35, p.689.

February 5

  • A comment by Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “Obama and the E.U.: A skip is not a snub”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by columnist Charles Krauthammer: “The peasant revolt of 2010”.

  • A book review in the February 3 issue of The Wall Street Journal by Matthew Kaminski: “Creating A Postwar World”
    The book is “Yalta: The Price of Peace” by S.M. Plokhy, Viking, $21.95, 451 p.

January 31

  • An article in the January 28 issue of the Washington Times by Hillel Italie: “J.D. Salinger author of “The Catcher in the Rye” dies at 91.”.

  • An op-ed by Andrew Baker, Director of International Jewish Affairs for the American Jewish Committee, in the January 30 issue of the Washington Post: “The Holocaust’s untended graves”.

  • A report by Jonathan Weisman in the January 30 issue of The Wall Street Journal: “Deficit Hawk Plays Against Type” ‘Orszag Seeks Ways to Sustain Recovery Amid Mounting Concerns Over Red Ink’.

January 26

  • An opinion piece in today’s Washington Times by Colin A. Hanna: “Massachusetts’ message: Reject arrogance”.

  • An article in today’s Washington Post on the passing of Charles McC. Mathias Jr. (1922-2010): “Renegade liberal Republican represented Maryland in Senate”.

  • A book review by William Drozdiak in last Sunday’s Washington Post.
    The book is “Daring Young Men” ‘The Heroism and Triumph of the Berlin Airlift, June 1948-May 1949’ by Richard Reeves, Simon & Schuster, $28, 316 p.

January 21

  • An op-ed by David Ignatius in today’s Washington Post: “In Haiti quake, a tragedy that defies logic”.

  • An article in the January 16 issue of The Wall Street Journal by Kevin Rozario: “Rising from the Ruins”.

  • In the same issue, a commentary by Peter Cowie on Ingmar Bergman’s film ‘The Seventh Seal’.

January 12

  • An op-ed by Anne Applebaum in today’s Washington Post: “We need a smarter way to fight the jihadi elite”.

  • In the same issue, an op-ed by Professor Paul C. Light of New York University, on the bureaucratic hurdles of the Federal Government: “The real crisis in government”.

  • An op-ed by columnist David Brooks in today’s New York Times: “The Tel Aviv Cluster”.

January 10

  • An op-ed in yesterday’s Washington Post: “Vaclav Havel and other Czech dissidents stand up for Chinese activist Liu Xiaobo”.

  • In the same issue an article by John Pomfret: “China’s lobbying efforts yield new influence, openness on Capitol Hill”.

  • In the January 6 issue of the Washington Post, a report by John Pancake: “In Ukraine, movement to honor members of the WW II underground sets off debate”.

January 7

  • An opinion piece in today’s Wall Street Journal by Paula J. Dobriansky. “The Realist Case for Tibetan Autonomy” - ‘Any change in U.S. policy toward the Dalai Lama will encourage bad behavior in Beijing’.

  • A comment by columnist Dana Milbank in today’s Washington Post with the title: “Sen. Dodd announces retirement with dignity – and honesty”.

  • A book review from the December 27, 2009 issue of The Washington Times by Aram Bakshian. 
    The book is “Children of Armenia: A Forgotten Genocide and the Century-Long Struggle for Justice” by Michael Bobelian, Simon & Schuster, $26, 308 p.

 


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